Don’t think about it any more: money brings happiness

Being rich does not bring happiness, but everyone prefers to cry in the limo. For years, psychological research seemed to support this famous phrase, but recent studies seem to show something a little more complex: money brings happiness, but simply because people who have more money tend to have more options and be able to make decisions that increase their happiness, and that may be helping others or experiencing experiences that light up our day up.

But there is a problem : lack of time. If you fall into the trap of non-stop work, you will have little time and you will not be able to spend the money on your favorite hobbies. And one more thing: does a giant car and a giant television bring happiness? Well, only up to a point. If you take them for granted, no, but if you learn to be grateful for everything you have, they are more likely to bring happiness.

If you fall into the trap of non-stop work, you will have little time and you will not be able to spend the money on your favorite hobbies.

Psychology Today offers some ideas for increasing happiness, based on advice from the authors of “Happy Money,” Harvard Business School professors and industry experts. Read carefully.

Buy experiences

Look for activities and experiences that appeal to you, whether it’s swimming with dolphins or taking a sewing class if that’s your thing. Experiences make you richer than anything else.

Appreciate things

Don’t go out to restaurants every day if you want to enjoy restaurant food. Instead, go to a restaurant that you consider special for special occasions.

Take time

Lack of time is a form of poverty. One study concluded that travelers who spent more time enjoying a trip were happier than those who spent less (not particularly surprising). Living closer to work, again unsurprisingly, increases happiness, as do hybrid schedules (working from home is great, but don’t underestimate the value of a casual chat with coworkers, which also brings happiness).

Pay now and spend later

Anticipation is sometimes the best part of any experience. You can maximize this effect by paying for your purchases in advance. You will likely spend less and enjoy spending more. On the other hand, accumulating debt is likely to stress you out.

give to others

You might be surprised to learn that for almost all of us, happiness often comes from giving to others (even more than to ourselves). It’s a good idea to give based on your income, but studies have shown that even people who struggled to make ends meet were happier after helping others.

Kindness to others (and not just spending money on them) is a factor in happiness.

Ultimately, the new science of well-being suggests that happiness is not tied to the possessions you own, but how you feel on a daily basis. Kindness to others (and not just spending money on them) is a factor in happiness.

Take care of yourself

It may sound silly, but plenty of research shows that getting enough sleep and exercise is linked to a positive mood. Good nutrition is also linked to well-being. We think sweets make us happy, but research has shown that eating fish, fruit and vegetables improves our mood. Again, it takes time.

Note that studies show that people in both rich and poor countries become happier after the age of 50.

And as a curiosity : if you find it difficult to take this advice, at least for now, remember that studies show that people, in both rich and poor countries, become happier after 50 .

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